Radish

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Gardening is slow. Really slow. Sometimes it’s so slow I forget what I’ve planted and then discover it later. I put these radish in for a bit of a quick crop. I had expanded out the veggie patch and was thinking I needed something that would crowd out any other little plants coming through. Water well while its growing and eat soon once it’s reached a good size otherwise it gets a bit woody. Radish can be added to salads, sandwiches or baked in the oven as they come through. I also pulled up the rest and pickled them.

Pickled radish

4 bunches of radish

1/2 cup apple cider vinegar

1/2 cup water

2 tablespoons raw sugar

1 teaspoon salt

optional, 1 tablespoon peppercorns, 1 tablespoon coriander seeds

Top and tail the radish and clean well. Slice each radish in half then place the flat side down and slice into thin semicircles. Place all the radish into sterilised jars. This amount made two small jars. Add flavour of choice to the jars . I added peppercorns to one and coriander to the other.

In a small pot, add the water, vinegar, sugar and salt. Boil for a minute or two to dissolve the sugar and salt. Pour over the radish and seal the jars. Store it in the fridge.

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Leek and asparagus puffs

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If you’re lucky you’ve stumbled across a wild patch of asparagus down by a creek somewhere. I haven’t yet but am always on the look out as they are in season right now. This asparagus grows in my garden and a pretty low maintenance once it gets going.  Just add compost and water every now and then.

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It’s been a long time since I last grew leek. I’d forgotten about these ones, they were quite neglected and hidden by some overgrown rocket going to seed and some cabbages. To get the long white blanched stem you need to be a bit more proactive and either mound up the dirt around the stem, use some cut down pieces of old plumbing pipe or old 1L milk cartons to shade the stem.

Put these both together and you’ve got a tasty lunch or dinner. Don’t throw those leek tops out. They can be used in place of onions or roasted with a bit of salt and oil and added to other meals as a side. Or saved in the freezer to add to homemade stock.

2 puff pastry sheets

4 small leeks, sliced

1 bunch asparagus, chopped

1 clove garlic, crushed

olive oil

4 long strands of thyme, leaves

4 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

1 egg

1/3 cup cashew cheese

1/3 cup nut milk

salt and pepper

Put the oven to 210C. Add some oil to a medium heat pan, add the leek, garlic and cook for about 10 minutes until soft. Add the chopped asparagus and herbs to the mix and cook for a few more minutes. You want the leek fairly caramelised.

Thaw the pastry or make your own pastry. Cut each sheet into four smaller squares. Fold the edges over about 1 cm on the edges to form a little ridge. Get your nails and press into the middle part to minimise the rise. Bake in oven for 10 minutes until just starting to puff up.

While the pastry is cooking in the oven mix whisk together the egg, cashew cheese, milk, salt and pepper to taste.

Pull the pastry out of oven and top with the leek mix. Spoon over about 1.5 dessert spoons of the egg mix over the leek mix until the centre part of the pastry is covered with the egg mix. Bake for about 20 minutes until golden brown. Makes 8.

Serve with a nice fresh green garden salad.

 

Dandelion

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Every part of the dandelion is edible, with supposedly more nutrition in one plant that in a whole week’s worth of supermarket food. These pop up in lawns and disturbed ground so like any foraged greens make sure they haven’t been sprayed. The leaves can be cooked or eaten raw in things like pestos or salads. The flowers make a nice addition to salads and the petals picked off and sprinkled on top of food as a pretty garnish. The flowers can be reduced into a syrup and used as a sugar substitute, or made into wine and beer. Leaves dried and drank as tea. The roots can be roasted into a coffee substitute or shredded and added to homemade sauerkraut mix.

The roots are better in winter as the sugars are pushed down into the root when the frosts kick in. It can regrow from a small part of the broken off root so don’t worry about depleting the stock if you pull out the plant. The plant is particularly high in minerals and is good for the body and garden – e.g. add it to weed tea fertiliser. The Latin name is Taraxacum officianale meaning the ‘the official remedy for all disorders’. It’s been used medicinally by many cultures for thousands of years. All round it’s a good plant to add to the diet.

Strawberry beer

Our household has developed a taste for kombucha and at $4 a bottle in the shops I’ve had to work out how to brew it at home. A friend lent me the very easy to follow book on ‘The art of probiotic nutrition’ by Kale Brock. It takes you through step by step on how to make kombucha. If you think it’s hard to make just check out this video from Kale to see just how easy it is.

Remove the scoby and place in glass jar with breathable lid and make sure it’s covered with Kombucha. Put the scoby aside in cupboard. With the rest of the Kombucha it’s time to do a secondary ferment.

While local hills strawberries are in season in the shops the varieties in my backyard come through earlier in October, November and into early December. I used about half a punnet for this recipe.

1/2 punnet strawberries

700 ml kombucha

You need a bottle with a nice airtight lid. I recycled a Bickfords soft drink bottle for this.  I mashed about half a punnet of strawberries and placed in the sterilised bottle. Then I topped up the bottle with kombucha leaving about 2 cm of air. I tapped the bottle to get rid of any air bubbles and gave the fruit a little stir to ensure good contact with the liquid. Seal the lid and ferment for 1-3 days depending on the weather. Put it in a cupboard while it’s fermenting. Test each day and put in fridge when ready.

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Be warned, to get the fizz you need to have a small amount of air up top. I left about 2cm and when I opened the bottle to test it, strawberry beer exploded out the top and kinda went everywhere. I’m not sure if it’s because it has been so hot the fermenting process sped up or if I should have left more air up top or I used too much fruit. Probably a combo of all three. The bad news is I lost about a quarter of the bottle. The good news is my ceiling, walls, floors and everything else in the kitchen have now had a good wipe down and I now have delicious fizzy strawberry beer. I didn’t strain the fruit out but if this was being kept for a while in the fridge before drinking I would strain the fruit out.

I have since read that it’s good to open a secondary ferment using a tea towel over the kitchen sink. And… I’ve found out that others find that strawberry kombucha is extra fizzy. I’ll be making this again for sure and making sure I open with tea towel over sink next time.